WATER TREATMENT CONFERENCE


Water Treatment Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Water Treatment is a conference track under the Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Marine and Environmental Sciences.

internationalscience.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Marine and Environmental Sciences).

Water Treatment is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Water Treatment Conference Track will be held at “Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference in Paris, France in November 2019” - “Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference in London, United Kingdom in January 2020” - “Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference in Tokyo, Japan in March 2020” - “Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands in May 2020” - “Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in June 2020” - “Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference in Stockholm, Sweden in July 2020” - “Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference in New York, United States in November 2020” .

Water Treatment is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

INTERNATIONAL MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 21 - 22, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 21, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 18MES11FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES CONFERENCE

JANUARY 21 - 22, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline December 19, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20MES01GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES CONFERENCE

MARCH 26 - 27, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline February 27, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20MES03JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES CONFERENCE

MAY 13 - 14, 2020
AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 14, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20MES05NL
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES CONFERENCE

JUNE 25 - 26, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20MES06TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES CONFERENCE

JULY 14 - 15, 2020
STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 11, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20MES07SE
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 13, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20MES09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20MES11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

Marine and Environmental Sciences Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Water Treatment Conference"

  • Closed Greenhouse Production Systems for Smart Plant Production in Urban Areas
    Authors: U. Schmidt, D. Dannehl, I. Schuch, J. Suhl, T. Rocksch, R. Salazar-Moreno, E. Fitz-Rodrigues, A. Rojano Aquilar, I. Lopez Cruz, G. Navas Gomez, R. A. Abraham, L. C. Irineo, N. G. Gilberto, Keywords: Semi closed, greenhouses, urban farming, solar heat collector, closed water cycles, aquaponics. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2363167 Abstract: The integration of agricultural production systems into urban areas is a challenge for the coming decades. Because of increasing greenhouse gas emission and rising resource consumption as well as costs in animal husbandry, the dietary habits of people in the 21st century have to focus on herbal foods. Intensive plant cultivation systems in large cities and megacities require a smart coupling of information, material and energy flow with the urban infrastructure in terms of Horticulture 4.0. In recent years, many puzzle pieces have been developed for these closed processes at the Humboldt University. To compile these for an urban plant production, it has to be optimized and networked with urban infrastructure systems. In the field of heat energy production, it was shown that with closed greenhouse technology and patented heat exchange and storage technology energy can be provided for heating and domestic hot water supply in the city. Closed water circuits can be drastically reducing the water requirements of plant production in urban areas. Ion sensitive sensors and new disinfection methods can help keep circulating nutrient solutions in the system for a longer time in urban plant production greenhouses.
  • A Finite Element/Finite Volume Method for Dam-Break Flows over Deformable Beds
    Authors: Alia Alghosoun, Ashraf Osman, Mohammed Seaid, Keywords: Dam-break flows, deformable beds, finite element method, finite volume method, linear elasticity, Shallow water equations. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474968 Abstract: A coupled two-layer finite volume/finite element method was proposed for solving dam-break flow problem over deformable beds. The governing equations consist of the well-balanced two-layer shallow water equations for the water flow and a linear elastic model for the bed deformations. Deformations in the topography can be caused by a brutal localized force or simply by a class of sliding displacements on the bathymetry. This deformation in the bed is a source of perturbations, on the water surface generating water waves which propagate with different amplitudes and frequencies. Coupling conditions at the interface are also investigated in the current study and two mesh procedure is proposed for the transfer of information through the interface. In the present work a new procedure is implemented at the soil-water interface using the finite element and two-layer finite volume meshes with a conservative distribution of the forces at their intersections. The finite element method employs quadratic elements in an unstructured triangular mesh and the finite volume method uses the Rusanove to reconstruct the numerical fluxes. The numerical coupled method is highly efficient, accurate, well balanced, and it can handle complex geometries as well as rapidly varying flows. Numerical results are presented for several test examples of dam-break flows over deformable beds. Mesh convergence study is performed for both methods, the overall model provides new insight into the problems at minimal computational cost.
  • Carcass Characteristics and Qualities of Philippine White Mallard (Anas boschas L.) and Pekin (Anas platyrhynchos L.) Duck
    Authors: Jerico M. Consolacion, Maria Cynthia R. Oliveros, Keywords: Crude fat, meat quality, water-holding capacity. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474589 Abstract: The Philippine White Mallard duck was compared with Pekin duck for potential meat production. A total of 50 ducklings were randomly assigned to five (5) pens per treatment after one month of brooding. Each pen containing five (5) ducks was considered as a replicate. The ducks were raised until 12 weeks of age and slaughtered at the end of the growing period. Meat from both breeds was analyzed. The data were subjected to the Independent-Sample T-test at 5% level of confidence. Results showed that post-mortem pH (0, 20 minutes, 50 minutes, 1 hour and 20 minutes, 1 hour and 50 minutes, and 24 hours ) did not differ significantly (P>0.05) between breeds. However, Pekin ducks (89.84±0.71) had a significantly higher water-holding capacity than Philippine White Mallard ducks (87.93±0.63) (P0.05) except for the yellowness of the lean muscles of the Pekin duck breast. Pekin duck meat (1.15±0.04) had significantly higher crude fat content than Philippine White Mallard (0.47±0.58). The study clearly showed that breed is a factor and provided some pronounced effects among the parameters. However, these results are considered as preliminary information on the meat quality of Philippine White Mallard duck. Hence, further studies are needed to understand and fully utilize it for meat production and develop different meat products from this breed.
  • Sunflower Irrigation with Two Different Types of Soil Moisture Sensors
    Authors: C. D. Papanikolaou, V. A. Giouvanis, E. A. Karatasiou, D. S. Dimakas, M. A. Sakellariou-Makrantonaki, Keywords: Irrigation scheduling, soil moisture sensors, sustainable agriculture, water saving. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474383 Abstract: Irrigation is one of the most important cultivation practices for each crop, especially in areas where rainfall is enough to cover the crop water needs. In such areas, the farmers must irrigate in order to achieve high economical results. The precise irrigation scheduling contributes to irrigation water saving and thus a valuable natural resource is protected. Under this point of view, in the experimental field of the Laboratory of Agricultural Hydraulics of the University of Thessaly, a research was conducted during the growing season of 2012 in order to evaluate the growth, seed and oil production of sunflower as well as the water saving, by applying different methods of irrigation scheduling. Three treatments in four replications were organized. These were: a) surface drip irrigation where the irrigation scheduling based on the Penman-Monteith (PM) method (control); b) surface drip irrigation where the irrigation scheduling based on a soil moisture sensor (SMS); and c) surface drip irrigation, where the irrigation scheduling based on a soil potential sensor (WM).
  • Functionality and Application of Rice Bran Protein Hydrolysates in Oil in Water Emulsions: Their Stabilities to Environmental Stresses
    Authors: R. Charoen, S. Tipkanon, W. Savedboworn, N. Phonsatta, A. Panya, Keywords: Functional properties, oil in water emulsion, protein hydrolysates, rice bran protein. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474327 Abstract: Rice bran protein hydrolysates (RBPH) were prepared from defatted rice bran of two different Thai rice cultivars (Plai-Ngahm-Prachinburi; PNP and Khao Dok Mali 105; KDM105) using an enzymatic method. This research aimed to optimize enzyme-assisted protein extraction. In addition, the functional properties of RBPH and their stabilities to environmental stresses including pH (3 to 8), ionic strength (0 mM to 500 mM) and the thermal treatment (30 °C to 90 °C) were investigated. Results showed that enzymatic process for protein extraction of defatted rice bran was as follows: enzyme concentration 0.075 g/ 5 g of protein, extraction temperature 50 °C and extraction time 4 h. The obtained protein hydrolysate powders had a degree of hydrolysis (%) of 21.05% in PNP and 19.92% in KDM105. The solubility of protein hydrolysates at pH 4-6 was ranged from 27.28-38.57% and 27.60-43.00% in PNP and KDM105, respectively. In general, antioxidant activities indicated by total phenolic content, FRAP, ferrous ion-chelating (FIC), and 2,2’-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) of KDM105 had higher than PNP. In terms of functional properties, the emulsifying activity index (EAI) was was 8.78 m²/g protein in KDM105, whereas PNP was 5.05 m²/g protein. The foaming capacity at 5 minutes (%) was 47.33 and 52.98 in PNP and KDM105, respectively. Glutamine, Alanine, Valine, and Leucine are the major amino acid in protein hydrolysates where the total amino acid of KDM105 gave higher than PNP. Furthermore, we investigated environmental stresses on the stability of 5% oil in water emulsion (5% oil, 10 mM citrate buffer) stabilized by RBPH (3.5%). The droplet diameter of emulsion stabilized by KDM105 was smaller (d < 250 nm) than produced by PNP. For environmental stresses, RBPH stabilized emulsions were stable at pH around 3 and 5-6, at high salt (< 400 mM, pH 7) and at temperatures range between 30-50°C.
  • Water and Beverage Consumption among Children and Adolescents in Tehran Metropolitan City of Iran
    Authors: Mitra Abtahi, Esmat Nasseri, Morteza Abodllahi, Keywords: Adolescents, beverages, children, water. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1317118 Abstract: Introduction: Adequate hydration is necessary for proper physical and mental function. The aim of this study is to determine the consumption of water and all other beverages in children (8-13 years) and adolescents (14-17 years) in Tehran metropolitan city of Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 455 children (8-13 years) and 334 adolescents (14-17 years) were retrieved from north, center, and south of Tehran (18 schools). Instrument for data collection consisted of a “demographic and general health” questionnaire and a “7-day fluid record”. Data analyses were performed with SPSS 16 software. Results: The mean total consumption of fluids in school children was 1302 ± 500.6 ml/day. The highest mean intakes were observed for water (666 ± 398 ml/day), followed by milk (239 ± 183 ml/day), regular soft beverages (RSB) (188 ± 148 ml/day), and juices (60 ± 74 ml/day). Water, hot drinks (mainly tea) and soft drinks intake was significantly more in boys than girls. A significantly lower intake of milk and a higher intake of RSB and hot beverages (mainly tea) have been seen among adolescents compared to children. Conclusion: The most important finding is that mean fluid intake of children and adolescents does not meet international adequate intake references for water and fluids. This finding may suggest the necessity of development of the local references. To improve fluid intake habits of children and adolescents, relevant policy making and actions are warranted.
  • Cercarial Diversity in Freshwater Snails from Selected Freshwater Bodies and Its Implication for Veterinary and Public Health in Kaduna State, Nigeria
    Authors: Fatima Muhammad Abdulkadir, D. B. Maikaje, Y. A. Umar, Keywords: Cercariae, diversity, freshwater snails, prevalence, trematodiasis. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1315823 Abstract: A study conducted to determine cercariae diversity and prevalence of trematode infection in freshwater snails from six freshwater bodies selected by systematic random sampling in Kaduna State was carried from January 2013 to December 2013. Freshwater snails and cercariae harvested from the study sites were morphologically identified. A total of 23,823 freshwater snails were collected from the six freshwater bodies: Bagoma dam, Gimbawa dam, Kangimi dam, Kubacha dam, Manchok water intake and Saminaka water intake. The observed freshwater snail species were: Melanoides tuberculata, Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Bulinus globosus, Lymnaea natalensis, Physa sp., Cleopatra bulimoides, Bellamya unicolor and Lanistes varicus. The freshwater snails were exposed to artificial bright light from a 100 Watt electric bulb in the laboratory to induce cercarial shedding. Of the total freshwater snails collected, 10.55% released one or more types of cercariae. Seven morphological types of cercariae were shed by six freshwater snail species namely: Brevifurcate-apharyngeate distome, Amphistome, Gymnocephalus, Longifurcate-pharyngeate monostome, Longifurcate-pharyngeate distome, Echinostome and Xiphidio cercariae. Infection was monotype in most of the freshwater snails collected; however, Physa species presented a mixed infection with Gymnocephalus and Longifurcate-pharyngeate distome cercariae. B. globosus and B. pfeifferi were the most preferred intermediate hosts with the prevalence of 13.48% and 13.46%, respectively. The diversity and prevalence of cercariae varied among the six freshwater bodies with Manchok water intake having the highest infestation (14.3%) and the least recorded in Kangimi dam (3.9%). There was a correlation trend between the number of freshwater snails and trematode infection with Manchok exhibiting the highest and Bagoma none. The highest cercarial diversity was observed in B. pfeifferi and B. globosus with four morphotypes each, and the lowest was in M. tuberculata with one morphotype. The general distribution of freshwater snails and the trematode cercariae they shed suggests the risk of human and animals to trematodiasis in Manchok community. Public health education to raise awareness on individual and communal action that may control snail breeding sites, prevent transmission and provide access to treatment should be intensified.
  • Identification of Microbial Community in an Anaerobic Reactor Treating Brewery Wastewater
    Authors: Abimbola M. Enitan, John O. Odiyo, Feroz M. Swalaha, Keywords: Bacteria, brewery wastewater, real-time quantitative PCR, UASB reactor. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314590 Abstract: The study of microbial ecology and their function in anaerobic digestion processes are essential to control the biological processes. This is to know the symbiotic relationship between the microorganisms that are involved in the conversion of complex organic matter in the industrial wastewater to simple molecules. In this study, diversity and quantity of bacterial community in the granular sludge taken from the different compartments of a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastewater was investigated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The phylogenetic analysis showed three major eubacteria phyla that belong to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Chloroflexi in the full-scale UASB reactor, with different groups populating different compartment. The result of qPCR assay showed high amount of eubacteria with increase in concentration along the reactor’s compartment. This study extends our understanding on the diverse, topological distribution and shifts in concentration of microbial communities in the different compartments of a full-scale UASB reactor treating brewery wastewater. The colonization and the trophic interactions among these microbial populations in reducing and transforming complex organic matter within the UASB reactors were established.
  • Rainfall–Runoff Simulation Using WetSpa Model in Golestan Dam Basin, Iran
    Authors: M. R. Dahmardeh Ghaleno, M. Nohtani, S. Khaledi, Keywords: Watershed simulation, WetSpa, stream flow, flood prediction. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1132499 Abstract: Flood simulation and prediction is one of the most active research areas in surface water management. WetSpa is a distributed, continuous, and physical model with daily or hourly time step that explains precipitation, runoff, and evapotranspiration processes for both simple and complex contexts. This model uses a modified rational method for runoff calculation. In this model, runoff is routed along the flow path using Diffusion-Wave equation which depends on the slope, velocity, and flow route characteristics. Golestan Dam Basin is located in Golestan province in Iran and it is passing over coordinates 55° 16´ 50" to 56° 4´ 25" E and 37° 19´ 39" to 37° 49´ 28"N. The area of the catchment is about 224 km2, and elevations in the catchment range from 414 to 2856 m at the outlet, with average slope of 29.78%. Results of the simulations show a good agreement between calculated and measured hydrographs at the outlet of the basin. Drawing upon Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient for calibration periodic model estimated daily hydrographs and maximum flow rate with an accuracy up to 59% and 80.18%, respectively.
  • The Effect of Alkaline Treatment on Tensile Strength and Morphological Properties of Kenaf Fibres for Yarn Production
    Authors: A. Khalina, K. Shaharuddin, M. S. Wahab, M. P. Saiman, H. A. Aisyah, Keywords: Alkaline treatment, Kenaf fibre, Tensile strength, Yarn production. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131547 Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of alkali treatment and mechanical properties of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) fibre for the development of yarn. Two different fibre sources are used for the yarn production. Kenaf fibres were treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the concentration of 3, 6, 9, and 12% prior to fibre opening process and tested for their tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Then, the selected fibres were introduced to fibre opener at three different opening processing parameters; namely, speed of roller feeder, small drum, and big drum. The diameter size, surface morphology, and fibre durability towards machine of the fibres were characterized. The results show that concentrations of NaOH used have greater effects on fibre mechanical properties. From this study, the tensile and modulus properties of the treated fibres for both types have improved significantly as compared to untreated fibres, especially at the optimum level of 6% NaOH. It is also interesting to highlight that 6% NaOH is the optimum concentration for the alkaline treatment. The untreated and treated fibres at 6% NaOH were then introduced to fibre opener, and it was found that the treated fibre produced higher fibre diameter with better surface morphology compared to the untreated fibre. Higher speed parameter during opening was found to produce higher yield of opened-kenaf fibres.