NUTRITION AND GROWTH CONFERENCE


Nutrition and Growth Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Nutrition and Growth is a conference track under the Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Nutrition and Food Engineering.

internationalscience.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Nutrition and Food Engineering).

Nutrition and Growth is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Nutrition and Growth Conference Track will be held at “Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference in Paris, France in November 2019” - “Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference in London, United Kingdom in January 2020” - “Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference in Tokyo, Japan in March 2020” - “Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands in May 2020” - “Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in June 2020” - “Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference in Stockholm, Sweden in July 2020” - “Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference in New York, United States in November 2020” .

Nutrition and Growth is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION AND FOOD ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 21 - 22, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 21, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 19NFE11FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION AND FOOD ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JANUARY 21 - 22, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline December 19, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NFE01GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION AND FOOD ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

MARCH 26 - 27, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline February 27, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NFE03JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION AND FOOD ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

MAY 13 - 14, 2020
AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 14, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NFE05NL
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION AND FOOD ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JUNE 25 - 26, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NFE06TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION AND FOOD ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JULY 14 - 15, 2020
STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 11, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NFE07SE
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION AND FOOD ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 13, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NFE09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION AND FOOD ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20NFE11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

Nutrition and Food Engineering Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Nutrition and Growth Conference"

  • Economic Analysis, Growth and Yield of Grafting Tomato Varieties for Solanum torvum as a Rootstock
    Authors: Evy Latifah, Eko Widaryanto, M. Dawam Maghfoer, Arifin, Keywords: Grafting technology, economic analysis, growth, yield of tomato, Solanum torvum. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474966 Abstract: Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) is potential vegetables to develop, because it has high economic value and has the potential to be exported. There is a decrease in tomato productivity due to unfavorable growth conditions such as bacterial wilt, fusarium wilt, high humidity, high temperature and inappropriate production technology. Grafting technology is one alternative technology. In addition to being able to control the disease in the soil, grafting is also able to increase the growth and yield of production. Besides, it is also necessary to know the economic benefits if using grafting technology. A promising eggplant rootstock for tomato grafting is Solanum torvum. S. torvum is selected as a rootstock with high compatibility. The purpose of this research is to know the effect of grafting several varieties of tomatoes with Solanum torvum as a rootstock. The experiment was conducted in Agricultural Extension Center Pare. Experimental Garden of Pare Kediri sub-district from July to early December 2016. The materials used were tomato Cervo varieties, Karina, Timoty, and Solanum torvum. Economic analysis, growth, and yield including plant height, number of leaves, percentage of disease and tomato production were used as performance measures. The study showed that grafting tomato Timoty scion with Solanum torvum as rootstock had higher production. Financially, grafting tomato Timoty and Cervo scion had higher profit about. 28,6% and 16,3% compared to Timoty and Cervo variety treatment without grafting.
  • Nutritional and Anti-Nutritional Composition of Banana Peels as Influenced by Microwave Drying Methods
    Authors: Azza A. Abou-Arab, Ferial M. Abu-Salem, Keywords: Banana peels, microwave drying, physical characteristics, nutritional composition, anti-nutritional composition. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1317334 Abstract: The influence of microwave drying methods on the nutritional and anti-nutritional composition and physical characteristics of banana peels was investigated. Banana peels were assessed for physical properties such as yield, pH value, bulk density, water holding capacity (WHC) and oil holding capacity (OHC). The results showed that, the yield of banana peels and pH value was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased by microwave drying (11.20% and pH 5.08, respectively) compared with control. Bulk density was increased by microwave drying and recorded 62.03 g/100 ml. The banana peels flour demonstrated that the highest WHC was 8.65 g water/g dry sample and OHC was 6.73 g oil/g dry sample compared to control. The results observed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in moisture, fiber and total carbohydrates content of banana peels; whereas, the rates of ash, protein and fat content were increased after drying by microwave compared with control. The lignin content of banana peels was significantly increased (P < 0.05) by microwave drying and the recorded value was 8.31% dw. The results also revealed that the ascorbic acid content was significantly decreased by microwave drying and recorded 18.32 mg/100 g dw vis. 23.51 mg/100 g dw for control. With regarding the anti-nutrients, phytates, alkaloids, oxalates and hydrogen cyanides levels in banana peels, it was in the threshold value mentioned as safety restrict. These results demonstrated that the levels of phytates, alkaloids, oxalates and hydrogen cyanides were decreased by microwave drying methods which recorded 4.07%, 5.45%, 0.85% and 32.15%, respectively.
  • Effects of Different Dietary Crude Fiber Levels on the Growth Performance of Finishing Su-Shan Pigs
    Authors: Li Bixia, Ren Shouwen, Fu Yanfeng, Tu Feng, Xiaoming Fang, Xueming Wang, Keywords: Su-Shan pigs, dietary crude fiber, growth performance, serum biochemical indexes. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1317090 Abstract: The utilization of dietary crude fiber in different breed pigs is not the same. Su-shan pigs are a new breed formed by crossing Taihu pigs and Yorkshire pigs. In order to understand the resistance of Su-shan pigs to dietary crude fiber, 150 Su-shan pigs with 60 kg of average body weight and similar body conditions were allocated to three groups randomly, and there are 50 pigs in each group. The percentages of dietary crude fiber were 8.35%, 9.10%, and 11.39%, respectively. At the end of the experiment, 15 pigs randomly selected from each group were slaughtered. The results showed as follows: average daily gain of the 9.10% group was higher than that of the 8.35% group and the 11.39% group; there was a significant difference between the 9.10% group and the 8.35% group (p < 0.05. Levels of urea nitrogen, total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein in the 9.10% group were significantly higher than those in the 8.35% group and the 11.39% group (p < 0.05). Ratios of meat to fat in the 9.10% group and the 11.39% group were significantly higher than that in the 8.35% group (p < 0.05). Lean percentage of 9.10% group was higher than that of 8.35% group and 11.39% group, but there was no significant difference in three groups (p > 0.05). The weight of small intestine and large intestine in the 11.39% group was higher than that in the 8.35% group, and the 9.10% group and the difference reached a significant level (p < 0.05). In conclusion, increasing dietary crude fiber properly could reduce fat percentage, and improve the ratio of meat to fat of finishing Su-shan pigs. The digestion and metabolism of dietary crude fiber promoted the development of stomach and intestine of finishing Su-shan pig.
  • The Effect of Temperature and Salinity on the Growth and Carotenogenesis of Three Dunaliella Species (Dunaliella sp. Lake Isolate, D. salina CCAP 19/18, and D. bardawil LB 2538) Cultivated under Laboratory Conditions
    Authors: Imen Hamed, Burcu Ak, Oya Işık, Leyla Uslu, Kubilay Kazım Vursavuş, Keywords: Dunaliella sp., Dunaliella salina, Dunaliella bardawil, stress factors, pigments, growth. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316233 Abstract: In this study, 3 species of Dunaliella (Dunaliella sp. Salt Lake isoalte (Tuz Gölü), Dunaliella salina CCAP19/18, and Dunaliella bardawil LB 2538) and their optical density, dry matter, chlorophyll a, total carotenoids, and β-carotene production were investigated in a batch system. The aim of this research was to compare carotenoids, and β-carotene production were investigated in a batch those 3 species. Therefore 2 stress factors were used: 2 different temperatures (20°C and 30°C) and 2 different salinities (30‰, and 60‰) were tested over a 17-day study. The highest growth and chlorophyll a was reported for Dunaliella sp. under 20°C/30‰ and 20°C/60‰ conditions respectively followed by D. bardawil and D. salina. Significant differences were noticed (p
  • Analysis of Fertilizer Effect in the Tilapia Growth of Mozambique (Oreochromis mossambicus)
    Authors: Sérgio Afonso Mulema, Andrés Carrión García, Vicente Ernesto, Keywords: Fertilizer, tilapia, growth, statistical methods. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1315831 Abstract: This paper analyses the effect of fertilizer (organic and inorganic) in the growth of tilapia. An experiment was implemented in the Aquapesca Company of Mozambique; there were considered four different treatments. Each type of fertilizer was applied in two of these treatments; a feed was supplied to the third treatment, and the fourth was taken as control. The weight and length of the tilapia were used as the growth parameters, and to measure the water quality, the physical-chemical parameters were registered. The results show that the weight and length were different for tilapias cultivated in different treatments. These differences were evidenced mainly by organic and feed treatments, where there was the largest and smallest value of these parameters, respectively. In order to prove that these differences were caused only by applied treatment without interference for the aquatic environment, a Fisher discriminant analysis was applied, which confirmed that the treatments were exposed to the same environment condition.
  • Nutritional Value of Rabbit Meat after Contamination with 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine
    Authors: Balgabay Sadepovich Maikanov, Laura Tyulegenovna Auteleyeva, Seidenova Simbat Polatbekovna, Keywords: 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, metabolic homeostasis, nutritional value, rabbit meat. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1315428 Abstract: In this article reduced nutritional value of the rabbits’ meat at 1, 1 dimethylhydrazine experimental toxicosis is shown. The assay was performed on liquid chromatograph SHIMADZU LC-20 Prominence (Japan) with fluorometric and spectrophotometric detector. This research has revealed that samples of rabbit meat of the experimental group had significant differences from the control group:in amino acids concentration from 1.2% to 9.1%; vitamin concentration from 11.2% to 60.5%, macro – minerals concentration from 17.4% to 78.1% and saturated fatty acids concentration from 17,1% to 34.5%, respectively. The decrease in the chemical composition of rabbits’ meat at 1,1 dimethylhydrazine toxicosis may be due to changes in the internal processes associated with impaired metabolic homeostasis of animals.
  • Growth Performance and Yield of the Edible White Rot Fungus (Pleurotus ostreatus) on Different Agro Waste Materials
    Authors: Terna T. Paul, Iloechuba P. Ngozika, Keywords: Agro wastes, growth, Pleurotus ostreatus, sterilization methods, yield. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314899 Abstract: A study was carried out to evaluate the growth and yield performance of Pleurotus ostreatus spawn on different organic substrates in Lafia, Nasarawa State, Nigeria. 50 g each of four different substrates namely; corncobs, rice straw, sugarcane bagasse and sawdust sourced locally from farmlands and processing sites, were amended with 2% calcium carbonate and calcium sulphide and sterilized using three sterilization methods namely; hot water, steam, and lime. Five grams of P. ostreatus spawn were inoculated unto treated substrates, incubated in the dark for 16 days and in light for 19 days at 25 0C for the commencement of pinhead and fruit body formations respectively. Growth and yield parameters such as days to full colonization, days to pinhead formation and days to fruit body formation were recorded. Cap diameter and fresh weight of mature mushrooms were also measured for a total count of four flushes. P. ostreatus spawn grown on sugarcane bagasse recorded the highest mean cap diameter (4.69 cm), highest mean fresh weight (34.68 g), highest biological efficiency (69.37%) and highest production rate (2.83 g per day). Spawn grown on rice straw recorded the least number of days to full substrate colonization (11.00). Spawn grown on corn cobs recorded the least mean number of days to pin head (18.75) and fruiting body formations (20.25). There were no significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) among the evaluated substrates with respect to growth and yield performance of P. ostreatus. Substrates sterilized with hot water supported the highest mean cap diameter (5.64 cm), highest biological efficiency (87.04%) and highest production rate (3.43 g per day) of P. ostreatus. Significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were observed in cap diameter, fresh weight, biological efficiency and production rates among the evaluated sterilization methods. Hot water sterilization of sugarcane bagasse could be adopted for enhanced yield of oyster mushrooms, especially among indigent farming communities in Nigeria and beyond.
  • Inter-Specific Differences in Leaf Phenology, Growth of Seedlings of Cork OAK (Quercus suber L.), Zeen Oak (Quercus canariensis Willd.) and Their Hybrid Afares Oak (Quercus afares Pomel) in the Nursery
    Authors: S. Mhamdi, O. Brendel, P. Montpied, K. Ben Yahia, N. Saouyah, B. Hasnaoui, E. Dreyer, Keywords: Leaf life span, growth, hybrid, evergreen, deciduous, seedlings, Q. afares Pomel, Q. suber L., Q. canariensis Willd. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314634 Abstract: Leaf Life Span (LLS) is used to classify trees into two main groups: evergreen and deciduous species. It varies according to the forms of life between taxonomic groups. Co-occurrence of deciduous and evergreen oaks is common in some Mediterranean type climate areas. Nevertheless, in the Tunisian forests, there is no enough information about the functional inter-specific diversity among oak species, especially in the mixed stand marked by the simultaneous presence of Q. suber L., Q. canariensis Willd. and their hybrid (Q. afares), the latter being an endemic oak species threatened with extinction. This study has been conducted to estimate the LLS, the relative growth rate, and the count of different growth flushes of samplings in semi-controlled conditions. Our study took 17 months, with an observation's interval of 4 weeks. The aim is to characterize and compare the hybrid species to the parental ones. Differences were observed among species, both for phenology and growth. Indeed, Q. suber saplings reached higher total height and number of growth flushes then Q. canariensis, while Q. afares showed much less growth flushes than the parental species. The LLS of parental species has exceeded the duration of the experiment, but their hybrid lost all leaves on all cohorts. The short LLSs of hybrid species are in accordance with this phenology in the field, but for Q. canariensis there was a contrast with observations in the field where phenology is strictly annual. This study allowed us to differentiate the hybrid from both parental species.
  • Effect of Dietary Supplementation of Allium Hookeri Root and Processed Sulfur on the Growth Performance of Guinea Pigs
    Authors: Nayeon, Lee, Won-Young, Cho, Hyun Joo, Jang, Chi-Ho, Lee, Keywords: Allium hookeri, processed sulfur, dietary supplementation, growth performance, guinea pig. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131854 Abstract: This study investigated the effects of the dietary supplementation of the Allium hookeri root, and processed sulfur, on the growth performance of guinea pigs. The guinea pigs were fed a control diet (CON), as well as the control diet including 1% freeze-dried Allium hookeri root (AH), or 0.1% processed sulfur (S), or including both the freeze-dried Allium hookeri root and the processed sulfur (AHS). The weight of perirenal adipose tissue (PAT) and the epididymal adipose tissue (EAT) in the AH were significantly lower than CON (p < 0.05). The serum cholesterols levels of the AH and the AHS were significantly lower than the S (p < 0.05). While the total saturated fatty acid content in the serum of the AH and AHS groups showed a tendency to decrease, the total monounsaturated fatty acid increased. The results of this study suggested that dietary consumption of Allium hookeri root may help to decrease fat accumulation, lower serum cholesterol levels, and control serum free fatty acid contents in the guinea pigs.
  • Growth Performance and Economy of Production of Pullets Fed on Different Energy Based Sources
    Authors: O. A. Anjola, M. A. Adejobi, A. Ogunbameru, F. P. Agbaye, R. O. Odunukan, Keywords: Growth performance, spaghetti, noodles, biscuit, profit, hematology and serum biochemistry. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131784 Abstract: This experiment was conducted for 8 weeks to evaluate the growth performance and economics of pullets fed on different dietary energy sources. A total of 300 Harco black was used for this experiment. The birds were completely randomized and divided into four diet treatment groups. Each treatment group had three replicates of twenty-five birds per replicate. Four diets containing maize, spaghetti, noodles, and biscuit was formulated to represent diet 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. Diet 1 containing maize is the control, while diet 2, 3, and 4 contains spaghetti, noodles, and biscuit waste meal at 100% replacement for maize on weight for weight basis. Performance indices on Feed intake, body weight, weight gain, feed conversion ratio (FCR) and economy of production were measured. Blood samples were also collected for heamatology and serum biochemistry assessment. The result of the experiment indicated that different dietary energy source fed to birds significantly (P < 0.05) affect feed intake, body weight, weight gain, and feed conversion ratio (FCR). The best cost of feed per kilogram of body weight gain was obtained in Spaghetti based diet (₦559.30). However, the best performance were obtained from diet 1(maize), it can be concluded that spaghetti as a replacement for maize in diet of pullet is most economical and profitable for production without any deleterious effects attached. Blood parameters of birds were not significantly (p > 0.05) influenced by the use of the dietary energy sources used in this experiment.