LIFE SCIENCES AND BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CONFERENCE


Life Sciences and Biomedical Research Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Life Sciences and Biomedical Research is a conference track under the Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Biomedical and Biological Engineering.

internationalscience.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Biomedical and Biological Engineering).

Life Sciences and Biomedical Research is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Life Sciences and Biomedical Research Conference Track will be held at “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Paris, France in November 2019” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in London, United Kingdom in January 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Tokyo, Japan in March 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands in May 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in June 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Stockholm, Sweden in July 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in New York, United States in November 2020” .

Life Sciences and Biomedical Research is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 21 - 22, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 21, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 18BBE11FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JANUARY 21 - 22, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline December 19, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE01GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

MARCH 26 - 27, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline February 27, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE03JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

MAY 13 - 14, 2020
AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 14, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE05NL
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JUNE 25 - 26, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE06TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JULY 14 - 15, 2020
STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 11, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE07SE
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 13, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Life Sciences and Biomedical Research Conference"

  • Sub-Lethal Effects of Thiamethoxam and Pirimicarb on Life-Table Parameters of Diaeretiella rapae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Parasitoid of Lipaphis erysimi (Hemiptera: Aphididae)
    Authors: Nastaran Rezaei, Mohammad Saeed Mossadegh, Farhan Kocheyli, Khalil Talebi Jahromi, Aurang Kavousi, Keywords: Diaeretiella rapae, Lipaphis erysimi, life-table study, pirimicarb, thiamethoxam. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474725 Abstract: Integrated Pest Management (IPM) aims to combine biological and chemical strategies and measures, hence highlighting the study of acute toxicity and sub-lethal effects of pesticides comprehensively. The present research focused on the side effects of thiamethoxam and pirimicarb sub-lethal concentrations on demographic parameters of Diaeretiella rapae (McIntosh Laboratory) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Adult parasitoids were exposed to LC25 of insecticides as well as distilled water as the control. The results showed that thiamethoxam adversely affected population parameters (r, λ, R0, T), adults' longevity, females' oviposition period and mean fecundity, and a similar trend was obtained for pirimicarb with the exception of generation time (T), the latter did not significantly change compared to the control. The intrinsic rate of increase (r) in the control and those treated with pirimicarb and thiamethoxam were 0.2801, 0.2064, 0.1525 days-1, respectively, and the sex ratio was biased toward females in all treatments. Furthermore, none of the insecticides influenced total pre-oviposition period (TPOP) and offspring emergence rate. In general, these results indicated that both insecticides potentially distort the demographic parameters of the parasitoid even at sub-lethal concentrations, and then they should not be considered for IPM program in the presence of D. rapae.
  • Effects of Selected Plant-Derived Nutraceuticals on the Quality and Shelf-Life Stability of Frankfurter Type Sausages during Storage
    Authors: Kazem Alirezalu, Javad Hesari, Zabihollah Nemati, Boukaga Farmani, Keywords: Antimicrobial, antioxidant, frankfurter-type sausage, green tea, olive oil, shelf life, Urtica dioica L. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1474605 Abstract: The application of natural plant extracts which are rich in promising antioxidants and antimicrobial ingredients in the production of frankfurter-type sausages addresses consumer demands for healthier, more functional meat products. The effects of olive leaves, green tea and Urtica dioica L. extracts on physicochemical, microbiological and sensory characteristic of frankfurter-type sausage were investigated during 45 days of storage at 4 °C. The results revealed that pH and phenolic compounds decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in all samples during storage. Sausages containing 500 ppm green tea extract (1.78 mg/kg) showed the lowest TBARS values compared to olive leaves (2.01 mg/kg), Urtica dioica L. (2.26 mg/kg) extracts and control (2.74 mg/kg). Plant extracts significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the count of total mesophilic bacteria, yeast and mold by at least 2 log cycles (CFU/g) than those of control samples. Sensory characteristics of texture showed no difference (P > 0.05) between sausage samples, but sausage containing Urtica dioica L. extract had the highest score regarding flavor, freshness odor, and overall acceptability. Based on the results, sausage containing plant extracts could have a significant impact on antimicrobial activity, antioxidant capacity, sensory score, and shelf life stability of frankfurter-type sausage.
  • Life Cycle-Based Analysis of Meat Production: Ecosystem Impacts
    Authors: Michelle Zeyuan Ma, Hermann Heilmeier, Keywords: Eutrophication, life cycle based analysis, sustainable food, waste management. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316484 Abstract: Recently, meat production ecosystem impacts initiated many hot discussions and researchers, and it is a difficult implementation to reduce such impacts due to the demand of meat products. It calls for better management and control of ecosystem impacts from every aspects of meat production. This article analyzes the ecosystem impacts of meat production based on meat products life cycle. The analysis shows that considerable ecosystem impacts are caused by different meat production steps: initial establishment phase, animal raising, slaughterhouse processing, meat consumption, and wastes management. Based on this analysis, the impacts are summarized as: leading factor for biodiversity loss; water waste, land use waste and land degradation; greenhouse gases emissions; pollution to air, water, and soil; related major diseases. The article also provides a discussion on a solution-sustainable food system, which could help in reducing ecosystem impacts. The analysis method is based on the life cycle level, it provides a concept of the whole meat industry ecosystem impacts, and the analysis result could be useful to manage or control meat production ecosystem impacts from investor, producer and consumer sides.
  • Inter-Specific Differences in Leaf Phenology, Growth of Seedlings of Cork OAK (Quercus suber L.), Zeen Oak (Quercus canariensis Willd.) and Their Hybrid Afares Oak (Quercus afares Pomel) in the Nursery
    Authors: S. Mhamdi, O. Brendel, P. Montpied, K. Ben Yahia, N. Saouyah, B. Hasnaoui, E. Dreyer, Keywords: Leaf life span, growth, hybrid, evergreen, deciduous, seedlings, Q. afares Pomel, Q. suber L., Q. canariensis Willd. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314634 Abstract: Leaf Life Span (LLS) is used to classify trees into two main groups: evergreen and deciduous species. It varies according to the forms of life between taxonomic groups. Co-occurrence of deciduous and evergreen oaks is common in some Mediterranean type climate areas. Nevertheless, in the Tunisian forests, there is no enough information about the functional inter-specific diversity among oak species, especially in the mixed stand marked by the simultaneous presence of Q. suber L., Q. canariensis Willd. and their hybrid (Q. afares), the latter being an endemic oak species threatened with extinction. This study has been conducted to estimate the LLS, the relative growth rate, and the count of different growth flushes of samplings in semi-controlled conditions. Our study took 17 months, with an observation's interval of 4 weeks. The aim is to characterize and compare the hybrid species to the parental ones. Differences were observed among species, both for phenology and growth. Indeed, Q. suber saplings reached higher total height and number of growth flushes then Q. canariensis, while Q. afares showed much less growth flushes than the parental species. The LLS of parental species has exceeded the duration of the experiment, but their hybrid lost all leaves on all cohorts. The short LLSs of hybrid species are in accordance with this phenology in the field, but for Q. canariensis there was a contrast with observations in the field where phenology is strictly annual. This study allowed us to differentiate the hybrid from both parental species.
  • Extended Shelf Life of Chicken Meat Using Carboxymethyl Cellulose Coated Polypropylene Films Containing Zataria multiflora Essential Oil
    Authors: Z. Honarvar, M. Farhoodi, M. R. Khani, S. Shojaee-Aliabadi, Keywords: Shelf life, chicken breast, polypropylene, carboxymethyl cellulose, essential oil. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131836 Abstract: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) coated polypropylene (PP) films containing Zataria multiflora (ZEO) essential oils (4%) as an antimicrobial packaging for chicken breast stored at 4 °C. To increase PP film hydrophilicity, it was treated by atmospheric cold plasma prior to coating by CMC. Then, different films including PP, PP/CMC, PP/CMC containing 4% of ZEO were used for the chicken meat packaging in vapor phase. Total viable count and pseudomonads population and oxidative (TBA) changes of the chicken breast were analyzed during shelf life. Results showed that the shelf life of chicken meat kept in films containing ZEO improved from three to nine days compared to the control sample without any direct contact with the film. Study of oxygen barrier properties of bilayer film without essential oils (0.096 cm3 μm/m2 d kPa) in comparison with PP film (416 cm3 μm/m2 d kPa) shows that coating of PP with CMC significantly reduces oxygen permeation of the obtained packaging (P
  • Consumer Choice Determinants in Context of Functional Food
    Authors: E. Grochowska-Niedworok, K. Brukało, M. Kardas, Keywords: Consumer choice, consumer knowledge, functional food, healthy lifestyle. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131778 Abstract: The aim of this study was to analyze and evaluate the consumption of functional food by consumers by: age, sex, formal education level, place of residence and diagnosed diseases. The study employed an ad hoc questionnaire in a group of 300 inhabitants of Upper Silesia voivodship. Knowledge of functional food among the group covered in the study was far from satisfactory. The choice of functional food was of intuitive character. In addition, the group covered was more likely to choose pharmacotherapy instead of diet-related prevention then, which can be associated with presumption of too distant effects and a long period of treatment.
  • Effect of Varying Diets on Growth, Development and Survival of Queen Bee (Apis mellifera L.) in Captivity
    Authors: Muhammad Anjum Aqueel, Zaighum Abbas, Mubasshir Sohail, Muhammad Abubakar, Hafiz Khurram Shurjeel, Abu Bakar Muhammad Raza, Muhammad Afzal, Sami Ullah, Keywords: Apis melifera L., dietary effect, survival and development, honey bee queen. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1128923 Abstract: Keeping in view the increasing demand, queen of Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) was reared artificially in this experiment at varying diets including royal jelly. Larval duration, pupal duration, weight, and size of pupae were evaluated at different diets including royal jelly. Queen larvae were raised by Doo Little grafting method. Four different diets were mixed with royal jelly and applied to larvae. Fructose, sugar, yeast, and honey were provided to rearing queen larvae along with same amount of royal jelly. Larval and pupal duration were longest (6.15 and 7.5 days, respectively) at yeast and shortest on honey (5.05 and 7.02 days, respectively). Heavier and bigger pupae were recorded on yeast (168.14 mg and 1.76 cm, respectively) followed by diets having sugar and honey. Due to production of heavier and bigger pupae, yeast was considered as best artificial diet for the growing queen larvae. So, in the second part of experiment, different amounts of yeast were provided to growing larvae along with fixed amount (0.5 g) of royal jelly. Survival rates of the larvae and queen bee were 70% and 40% in the 4-g food, 86.7% and 53.3% in the 6-g food, and 76.7% and 50% in the 8-g food. Weight of adult queen bee (1.459±0.191 g) and the number of ovarioles (41.7±21.3) were highest at 8 g of food. Results of this study are helpful for bee-keepers in producing fitter queen bees.
  • Prophylactic Effects of Dairy Kluyveromyces marxianus YAS through Overexpression of BAX, CASP 3, CASP 8 and CASP 9 on Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines
    Authors: Amir Saber Gharamaleki, Beitollah Alipour, Zeinab Faghfoori, Ahmad YariKhosroushahi, Keywords: Anticancer, anti-proliferative, apoptosis, cytotoxicity, yeast. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1112047 Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancers and intestinal microbial community plays an important role in colorectal tumorigenesis. Probiotics have recently been assessed as effective anti-proliferative agents and thus this study was performed to examine whether CRC undergo apoptosis by treating with isolated Iranian native dairy yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus YAS, secretion metabolites. The cytotoxicity assessments on cells (HT-29, Caco-2) were accomplished through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as well as qualitative DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining) and quantitative (flow cytometry assessments) evaluations of apoptosis. To evaluate the main mechanism of apoptosis, Real time PCR method was applied. Kluyveromyces marxianus YAS secretions (IC50) showed significant cytotoxicity against HT-29 and Caco-2 cancer cell lines (66.57 % and 66.34 % apoptosis) similar to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) while apoptosis only was developed in 27.57 % of KDR normal cells. The prophylactic effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus (PTCC 5195), as a reference yeast, was not similar to Kluyveromyces marxianus YAS indicating strain dependency of bioactivities on CRC disease prevention. Based on real time PCR results, the main cytotoxicity is related to apoptosis phenomenon and the core related mechanism is depended on the overexpression of BAX, CASP 9, CASP 8 and CASP 3 inducing apoptosis genes. However, several investigations should be conducted to precisely determine the effective compounds to be used as anticancer therapeutics in the future.
  • Exploration of Floristic Composition and Management of Gujar Tal in District Jaunpur
    Authors: Mayank Singh, Mahendra P. Singh, Keywords: Floristic, life form, management, weeds. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1327244 Abstract: Present paper enumerates highlights of seasonal variation in floristic composition and ecological strategies for the management of ‘Gujar Tal’ at Jaunpur in tropical semi-arid region of eastern U.P. (India). Total composition of macrophytes recorded was 47 from 26 families with maximum 6 plant species of Cyperaceae from April, 2012 to March, 2013 at certain periodic intervals. Maximum number of plants (39) was present during winter followed by (37) rainy and (27) summer seasons. The distribution pattern depicted that maximum number of plants (27) was of marshy and swampy habitats usually transitional between land and water.
  • A New Method to Enhance Contrast of Electron Micrograph of Rat Tissues Sections
    Authors: Lise P. Labéjof, Raiza S. P. Bizerra, Galileu B. Costa, Thaísa B. dos Santos, Keywords: Image quality, Microscopy research, Staining technique, Ultrathin section. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1108374 Abstract: This report presents an alternative technique of application of contrast agent in vivo, i.e. before sampling. By this new method the electron micrograph of tissue sections have an acceptable contrast compared to other methods and present no artifact of precipitation on sections. Another advantage is that a small amount of contrast is needed to get a good result given that most of them are expensive and extremely toxic.