BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE


Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Biomedical and Biological Engineering is a conference track under the Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Biomedical and Biological Engineering.

internationalscience.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Biomedical and Biological Engineering).

Biomedical and Biological Engineering is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference Track will be held at “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Paris, France in November 2019” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in London, United Kingdom in January 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Tokyo, Japan in March 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands in May 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in June 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Stockholm, Sweden in July 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference in New York, United States in November 2020” .

Biomedical and Biological Engineering is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 21 - 22, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 21, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 18BBE11FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JANUARY 21 - 22, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline December 19, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE01GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

MARCH 26 - 27, 2020
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline February 27, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE03JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

MAY 13 - 14, 2020
AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 14, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE05NL
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JUNE 25 - 26, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE06TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JULY 14 - 15, 2020
STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 11, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE07SE
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 13, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 28, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BBE11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Biomedical and Biological Engineering Conference"

  • Principle Knowledge of Integrated Pest Management Adopting Cotton Cultivators in Irrigated and Rainfed Conditions: A Critical Analysis
    Authors: B. Sudhakar, K. A. Ponnusamy, Keywords: Biological practices, chemical practices, cultural practices, mechanical practices, integrated pest management. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2571926 Abstract: In India cotton was the major commercial crop and cultivating all the states. In recent years, area of cotton declined due to pest and disease attack, drought, lower price for the produces etc. The first reason as pest and disease attack will be the challenges and it is of utmost importance that in future the insect problems would have to be tackled through Integrated Pest Management (IPM). The present study deals with principle knowledge of IPM adopting cotton cultivators in irrigated and rainfed conditions. Under irrigated conditions, among cultural practices, all respondents had principle knowledge about growing high yielding and pest resistant hybrids, sowing quality and certified seeds and avoiding cotton ratoon cropping. Regarding mechanical practices all respondents had principle knowledge about collecting and destroying egg, larvae and pupae of pests and removing and destroying pest and disease infected cotton squares, flowers and other shed materials. With regard to biological practices, 93% of them had principle knowledge about spraying neem oil, followed by 82% about tying Trichogramma eggcard. Among chemical practices, more than 90% of the respondents had principle knowledge about of spraying herbicide (96%), identifying ETL (Economic Threshold Level) for cotton pests (94%), and applying safe insecticides (90%). Under rainfed condition, among cultural practices, all respondents had principle knowledge about sowing quality and certified seeds and growing high yielding and pest resistant hybrids seeds. Regarding mechanical practices hundred percentage of the respondents had principle knowledge on the mechanical practices viz., collecting and destroying egg, larvae and pupae of pests and removing and destroying pest and disease infected cotton squares, flowers and other shed materials. With regard to biological practices, 96% of the respondents had correct in principle knowledge about spraying neem oil, followed by 89% about tying Trichogramma eggcard. With regard to chemical practices, more than 90% of the respondents had principle knowledge of applying safe insecticides (95%), avoiding repeated use of the same insecticides (95%), identifying ETL for cotton pests (94%) and applying granular insecticides (90%).
  • Problems and Prospects of Agricultural Biotechnology in Nigeria’s Developing Economy
    Authors: Samson Abayomi Olasoju, Olufemi Adekunle, Titilope Edun, Johnson Owoseni, Keywords: Biosafety, biotechnology, food security, genetic engineering, genetic modification. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.2021611 Abstract: Science offers opportunities for revolutionizing human activities, enriched by input from scientific research and technology. Biotechnology is a major force for development in developing countries such as Nigeria. It is found to contribute to solving human problems like water and food insecurity that impede national development and threaten peace wherever it is applied. This review identified the problems of agricultural biotechnology in Nigeria. On the part of rural farmers, there is a lack of adequate knowledge or awareness of biotechnology despite the fact that they constitute the bulk of Nigerian farmers. On part of the government, the problems include: lack of adequate implementation of government policy on bio-safety and genetically modified products, inadequate funding of education as well as research and development of products related to biotechnology. Other problems include: inadequate infrastructures (including laboratory), poor funding and lack of national strategies needed for development and running of agricultural biotechnology. In spite of all the challenges associated with agricultural biotechnology, its prospects still remain great if Nigeria is to meet with the food needs of the country’s ever increasing population. The introduction of genetically engineered products will lead to the high productivity needed for commercialization and food security. Insect, virus and other related diseases resistant crops and livestock are another viable area of contribution of biotechnology to agricultural production. In conclusion, agricultural biotechnology will not only ensure food security, but, in addition, will ensure that the local farmers utilize appropriate technology needed for large production, leading to the prosperity of the farmers and national economic growth, provided government plays its role of adequate funding and good policy implementation.
  • Application of Metarhizium anisopliae against Meloidogyne javanica in Soil Amended with Oak Debris
    Authors: Mohammad Abdollahi, Keywords: Biological control, nematode management, organic soil, Quercus branti, root knot nematode, soil amendment. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1315771 Abstract: Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) is one of the most popular, widely grown and the second most important vegetable crop, after potatoes. Nematodes have been identified as one of the major pests affecting tomato production throughout the world. The most destructive nematodes are the genus Meloidogyne. Most widespread and devastating species of this genus are M. incognita, M. javanica, and M. arenaria. These species can cause complete crop loss under adverse growing conditions. There are several potential methods for management of the root knot nematodes. Although the chemicals are widely used against the phytonematodes, because of hazardous effects of these compounds on non-target organisms and on the environment, there is a need to develop other control strategies. Nowadays, non-chemical measures are widely used to control the plant parasitic nematodes. Biocontrol of phytonematodes is an important method among environment-friendly measures of nematode management. There are some soil-inhabiting fungi that have biocontrol potential on phytonematodes, which can be used in nematode management program. The fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, originally is an entomopathogenic bioagent. Biocontrol potential of this fungus on some phytonematodes has been reported earlier. Recently, use of organic soil amendments as well as the use of bioagents is under special attention in sustainable agriculture. This research aimed to reduce the pesticide use in control of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica in tomato. The effects of M. anisopliae IMI 330189 and different levels of oak tree debris on M. javanica were determined. The combination effect of the fungus as well as the different rates of soil amendments was determined. Pots were filled with steam pasteurized soil mixture and the six leaf tomato seedlings were inoculated with 3000 second stage larvae of M. javanica/kg of soil. After eight weeks, plant growth parameters and nematode reproduction factors were compared. Based on the results of our experiment, combination of M. anisopliae IMI 330189 and oak debris caused more than 90% reduction in reproduction factor of nematode, at the rates of 100 and 150 g/kg soil (P ≤ 0.05). As compared to control, the reduction in number of galls was 76%. It was 86% for nematode reproduction factor, showing the significance of combined effect of both tested agents. Our results showed that plant debris can increase the biological activity of the tested bioagent. It was also proved that there was no adverse effect of oak debris, which potentially has antimicrobial activity, on antagonistic power of applied bioagent.
  • Biological Control of Tomato Wilt Fungi Using Leaf Extracts of Bitter Leaf (Vernonia amygdalina)
    Authors: Terna T. Paul, Agbara D. Onwoke, Keywords: Biological control, fungi, leaf extracts, tomato wilt, V. amygdalina. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314612 Abstract: The antifungal potential of ethanolic leaf extracts of Vernonia amygdalina in the biological control of some common tomato wilt fungi was investigated. The experiment was set up in Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with eight treatments and three replicates. 5 mm diameter agar discs of 7 days old cultures of Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolfsii were obtained using a sterile 5 mm diameter cork borer and cultured on Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) inoculated with 5 ml of various concentrations of V. amygdalina ethanolic leaf extracts in petri dishes, and incubated for 10 days at 28 0C. The highest radial growth inhibitions of F. oxysporum (34.98%) and S. rolfsii (31.05%) were recorded 48 hours post-inoculation, both at 75% extract concentration. The leaf extracts of V. amygdalina used in the study exhibited significant inhibition of radial growth of the test organisms (P ≤ 0.05) and could be applied in the biological control of fungal wilt pathogens of tomato as a means of enhancing tomato yield and productivity.
  • Method of Cluster Based Cross-Domain Knowledge Acquisition for Biologically Inspired Design
    Authors: Shen Jian, Hu Jie, Ma Jin, Peng Ying Hong, Fang Yi, Liu Wen Hai, Keywords: Knowledge based engineering, biologically inspired design, knowledge cell, knowledge clustering, knowledge acquisition. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314576 Abstract: Biologically inspired design inspires inventions and new technologies in the field of engineering by mimicking functions, principles, and structures in the biological domain. To deal with the obstacles of cross-domain knowledge acquisition in the existing biologically inspired design process, functional semantic clustering based on functional feature semantic correlation and environmental constraint clustering composition based on environmental characteristic constraining adaptability are proposed. A knowledge cell clustering algorithm and the corresponding prototype system is developed. Finally, the effectiveness of the method is verified by the visual prosthetic device design.
  • Microbiological Quality and Safety of Meatball Sold in Payakumbuh City, West Sumatra, Indonesia
    Authors: Ferawati, H. Purwanto, Y. F. Kurnia, E. Purwati, Keywords: Borax, formalin, meatball, microbiological quality. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131545 Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbiological quality and safety of meatball obtained from five different manufacturers around Payakumbuh City, West Sumatra, Indonesia. Microbiological analysis of meatball sample resulted in aerobic plate count range from 7 log CFU/gr to 8.623 log CFU/gr, respectively. Total coliform ranges from 1.041 log Most Probable Number (MPN)/gr to 3.380 log MPN/gr, respectively. Chemical analysis of meatball sample consisted of borax and formalin content. The result of qualitative detection of borax and formalin content on all meatball samples were not detected. Thus, it remains essential to include the significance of effective hygiene practices as an important safety measure in consumer education programmes.
  • Reverse Engineering of Agricultural Machinery: A Key to Food Sufficiency in Nigeria
    Authors: Williams S. Ebhota, Virginia Chika Ebhota, Samuel A. Ilupeju, Keywords: Agricultural machinery, domestic manufacturing, forward engineering, production reverse engineering, technology. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1130057 Abstract: Agriculture employs about three-quarter of Nigeria's workforce and yet food sufficiency is a challenge in the country. This is largely due to poor and outdated pre-harvest and post-harvest farming practices. The land fallow system is still been practised as fertiliser production in the country is grossly inadequate and expensive. The few available post-harvest processing facilities are faced with ageing and are inefficient. Also, use of modern processing equipment is limited by farmers' lack of fund, adequate capacity to operate and maintain modern farming equipment. This paper, therefore, examines key barriers to agricultural products processing equipment in the country. These barriers include over-dependence on foreign technologies and expertise; poor and inadequate manufacturing infrastructure; and lack of political will by political leaders; lack of funds; and lack of adequate technical skills. This paper, however, sees the increase in the domestic manufacturing of pre-harvest and post-harvest machinery and equipment through reverse engineering approach as a key to food production sufficiency in Nigeria.
  • Microbiological Analysis, Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects from Material Captured in PM2.5 and PM10 Filters Used in the Aburrá Valley Air Quality Monitoring Network (Colombia)
    Authors: Carmen E. Zapata, Juan Bautista, Olga Montoya, Claudia Moreno, Marisol Suarez, Alejandra Betancur, Duvan Nanclares, Natalia A. Cano, Keywords: Cytotoxic, genotoxic, microbiological analysis, PM10, PM2.5. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1126119 Abstract: This study aims to evaluate the diversity of microorganisms in filters PM2.5 and PM10; and determine the genotoxic and cytotoxic activity of the complex mixture present in PM2.5 filters used in the Aburrá Valley Air Quality Monitoring Network (Colombia). The research results indicate that particulate matter PM2.5 of different monitoring stations are bacteria; however, this study of detection of bacteria and their phylogenetic relationship is not complete evidence to connect the microorganisms with pathogenic or degrading activities of compounds present in the air. Additionally, it was demonstrated the damage induced by the particulate material in the cell membrane, lysosomal and endosomal membrane and in the mitochondrial metabolism; this damage was independent of the PM2.5 concentrations in almost all the cases.
  • Perceptions of Greenhouse Vegetable Growers Regarding Use of Biological Control Practices: A Case Study in Jiroft County, Iran
    Authors: Hossein Shabanali Fami, Omid Sharifi, Javad Ghasemi, Mahtab Pouratashi, Mona Sadat Moghadasian, Keywords: Greenhouse, biological control, biological agents, perception, vegetable grower. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1125513 Abstract: The main purpose of this study was to investigate perception of greenhouse vegetable growers regarding use of biological control practices during the growing season. The statistical population of the study included greenhouse vegetable growers in Jiroft county (N=1862). A sample of 137 vegetable growers was selected, using random sampling method. Data were collected via a questionnaire. The validity of the instrument was obtained by the faculty members of the Department of Agricultural Development and Management in the University of Tehran. Cronbach’s alpha was applied to estimate the reliability which showed a high reliability for the instrument. Data was analyzed using SPSS/Windows 13.5. The results revealed that greenhouse vegetable growers had moderate level of perception regarding biological control practices. Levels of vegetable growers’ perceptions regarding biological control practices were different on the basis of their academic qualifications as well as educational level and job. In addition, the results indicated that about 54.1% of variations in vegetable growers’ perceptions could be explained by variables such as awareness of biological control practices, knowledge on pests, annual production and age.
  • The Effect of Application of Biological Phosphate Fertilizer (Fertile 2) and Triple Super Phosphate Chemical Fertilizers on Some Morphological Traits of Corn (SC704)
    Authors: M. Mojaddam, M. Araei, T. Saki Nejad, M. Soltani Howyzeh, Keywords: Biological phosphate fertilizer, corn (SC704), morphological, triple super phosphate. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1108082 Abstract: In order to study the effect of different levels of triple super phosphate chemical fertilizer and biological phosphate fertilizer (fertile 2) on some morphological traits of corn this research was carried out in Ahvaz in 2002 as a factorial experiment in randomized complete block design with 4 replications). The experiment included two factors: first, biological phosphate fertilizer (fertile 2) at three levels of 0, 100, 200 g/ha; second, triple super phosphate chemical fertilizer at three levels of 0, 60, 90 kg/ha of pure phosphorus (P2O5). The obtained results indicated that fertilizer treatments had a significant effect on some morphological traits at 1% probability level. In this regard, P2B2 treatment (100 g/ha biological phosphate fertilizer (fertile 2) and 60 kg/ha triple super phosphate fertilizer) had the greatest plant height, stem diameter, number of leaves and ear length. It seems that in Ahvaz weather conditions, decrease of consumption of triple superphosphate chemical fertilizer to less than a half along with the consumption of biological phosphate fertilizer (fertile 2) is highly important in order to achieve optimal results. Therefore, it can be concluded that biological fertilizers can be used as a suitable substitute for some of the chemical fertilizers in sustainable agricultural systems.