ANIMAL CLONING AND GENETIC ENGINEERING CONFERENCE


Animal Cloning and Genetic Engineering Conference is one of the leading research topics in the international research conference domain. Animal Cloning and Genetic Engineering is a conference track under the Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Biotechnology and Bioengineering.

internationalscience.net provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of (Biotechnology and Bioengineering).

Animal Cloning and Genetic Engineering is not just a call for academic papers on the topic; it can also include a conference, event, symposium, scientific meeting, academic, or workshop.

You are welcome to SUBMIT your research paper or manuscript to Animal Cloning and Genetic Engineering Conference Track will be held at “Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference in Paris, France in November 2019” - “Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference in London, United Kingdom in January 2020” - “Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference in Tokyo, Japan in March 2020” - “Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands in May 2020” - “Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference in Istanbul, Turkey in June 2020” - “Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference in Stockholm, Sweden in July 2020” - “Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference in Zürich, Switzerland in September 2020” - “Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference in New York, United States in November 2020” .

Animal Cloning and Genetic Engineering is also a leading research topic on Google Scholar, Semantic Scholar, Zenedo, OpenAIRE, BASE, WorldCAT, Sherpa/RoMEO, Elsevier, Scopus, Web of Science.

INTERNATIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 21 - 22, 2019
PARIS, FRANCE

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 21, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 18BB11FR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JANUARY 21 - 22, 2020
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline December 19, 2019
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BB01GB
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

MARCH 26 - 15, 2018
TOKYO, JAPAN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline February 27, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BB03JP
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

MAY 13 - 14, 2020
AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline April 14, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BB05NL
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JUNE 25 - 26, 2020
ISTANBUL, TURKEY

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline May 26, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BB06TR
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

JULY 14 - 15, 2020
STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline June 11, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BB07SE
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

SEPTEMBER 15 - 16, 2020
ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline August 13, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BB09CH
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

INTERNATIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 05 - 06, 2020
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

  • Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline February 28, 2019
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection Deadline March 14, 2019
  • Final Paper and Early Bird Registration Deadline October 05, 2020
  • CONFERENCE CODE: 20BB11US
  • One Time Submission Deadline Reminder

Biotechnology and Bioengineering Conference Call For Papers are listed below:

Previously Published Papers on "Animal Cloning and Genetic Engineering Conference"

  • Cloning, Expression and Protein Purification of AV1 Gene of Okra Leaf Curl Virus Egyptian Isolate and Genetic Diversity between Whitefly and Different Plant Hosts
    Authors: Dalia. G. Aseel, Keywords: Begomovirus, AV1 gene, sequence, cloning, whitefly, okra, cotton, tomato, RAPD, phylogenetic tree and SDS-PAGE. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1475010 Abstract: Begomoviruses are economically important plant viruses that infect dicotyledonous plants and exclusively transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. Here, replicative form was isolated from Okra, Cotton, Tomato plants and whitefly infected with Begomoviruses. Using coat protein specific primers (AV1), the viral infection was verified with amplicon at 450 bp. The sequence of OLCuV-AV1 gene was recorded and received an accession number (FJ441605) from Genebank. The phylogenetic tree of OLCuV was closely related to Okra leaf curl virus previously isolated from Cameroon and USA with nucleotide sequence identity of 92%. The protein purification was carried out using His-Tag methodology by using Affinity Chromatography. The purified protein was separated on SDS-PAGE analysis and an enriched expected size of band at 30 kDa was observed. Furthermore, RAPD and SDS-PAGE were used to detect genetic variability between different hosts of okra leaf curl virus (OLCuV), cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV), tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCuV) and the whitefly vector. Finally, the present study would help to understand the relationship between the whitefly and different economical crops in Egypt.
  • Humans as Enrichment: Human-Animal Interactions and the Perceived Benefit to the Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), Human and Zoological Establishment
    Authors: S. J. Higgs, E. Van Eck, K. Heynis, S. H. Broadberry, Keywords: Acinonyx jubatus, encounters, human-animal interactions, perceptions, zoological establishments. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1316209 Abstract: Engagement with non-human animals is a rapidly-growing field of study within the animal science and social science sectors, with human-interactions occurring in many forms; interactions, encounters and animal-assisted therapy. To our knowledge, there has been a wide array of research published on domestic and livestock human-animal interactions, however, there appear to be fewer publications relating to zoo animals and the effect these interactions have on the animal, human and establishment. The aim of this study was to identify if there were any perceivable benefits from the human-animal interaction for the cheetah, the human and the establishment. Behaviour data were collected before, during and after the interaction on the behaviour of the cheetah and the human participants to highlight any trends with nine interactions conducted. All 35 participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire prior to the interaction and immediately after to ascertain if their perceptions changed following an interaction with the cheetah. An online questionnaire was also distributed for three months to gain an understanding of the perceptions of human-animal interactions from members of the public, gaining 229 responses. Both questionnaires contained qualitative and quantitative questions to allow for specific definitive answers to be analysed, but also expansion on the participants perceived perception of human-animal interactions. In conclusion, it was found that participants’ perceptions of human-animal interactions saw a positive change, with 64% of participants altering their opinion and viewing the interaction as beneficial for the cheetah (reduction in stress assumed behaviours) following participation in a 15-minute interaction. However, it was noted that many participants felt the interaction lacked educational values and therefore this is an area in which zoological establishments can work to further improve upon. The results highlighted many positive benefits for the human, animal and establishment, however, the study does indicate further areas for research in order to promote positive perceptions of human-animal interactions and to further increase the welfare of the animal during these interactions, with recommendations to create and regulate legislation.
  • Analysis of Genetic Variations in Camel Breeds (Camelus dromedarius)
    Authors: Yasser M. Saad, Amr A. El Hanafy, Saleh A. Alkarim, Hussein A. Almehdar, Elrashdy M. Redwan, Keywords: Camel, genetics, ISSR, cox1, neighbor-joining. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314602 Abstract: Camels are substantial providers of transport, milk, sport, meat, shelter, security and capital in many countries, particularly in Saudi Arabia. Inter simple sequence repeat technique was used to detect the genetic variations among some camel breeds (Majaheim, Safra, Wadah, and Hamara). Actual number of alleles, effective number of alleles, gene diversity, Shannon’s information index and polymorphic bands were calculated for each evaluated camel breed. Neighbor-joining tree that re-constructed for evaluated these camel breeds showed that, Hamara breed is distantly related from the other evaluated camels. In addition, the polymorphic sites, haplotypes and nucleotide diversity were identified for some camelidae cox1 gene sequences (obtained from NCBI). The distance value between C. bactrianus and C. dromedarius (0.072) was relatively low. Analysis of genetic diversity is an important way for conserving Camelus dromedarius genetic resources.
  • Method of Cluster Based Cross-Domain Knowledge Acquisition for Biologically Inspired Design
    Authors: Shen Jian, Hu Jie, Ma Jin, Peng Ying Hong, Fang Yi, Liu Wen Hai, Keywords: Knowledge based engineering, biologically inspired design, knowledge cell, knowledge clustering, knowledge acquisition. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1314576 Abstract: Biologically inspired design inspires inventions and new technologies in the field of engineering by mimicking functions, principles, and structures in the biological domain. To deal with the obstacles of cross-domain knowledge acquisition in the existing biologically inspired design process, functional semantic clustering based on functional feature semantic correlation and environmental constraint clustering composition based on environmental characteristic constraining adaptability are proposed. A knowledge cell clustering algorithm and the corresponding prototype system is developed. Finally, the effectiveness of the method is verified by the visual prosthetic device design.
  • The Efficiency of Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit 1 Gene (cox1) in Reconstruction of Phylogenetic Relations among Some Crustacean Species
    Authors: Yasser M. Saad, Heba El-Sebaie Abd El-Sadek, Keywords: Crustacean, Genetics, cox1, phylogeny. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131475 Abstract: Some Metapenaeus monoceros cox1 gene fragments were isolated, purified, sequenced, and comparatively analyzed with some other Crustacean Cox1 gene sequences (obtained from National Center for Biotechnology Information). This work was designed for testing the efficiency of this system in reconstruction of phylogenetic relations among some Crustacean species belonging to four genera (Metapenaeus, Artemia, Daphnia and Calanus). The single nucleotide polymorphism and haplotype diversity were calculated for all estimated mt-DNA fragments. The genetic distance values were 0.292, 0.015, 0.151, and 0.09 within Metapenaeus species, Calanus species, Artemia species, and Daphnia species, respectively. The reconstructed phylogenetic tree is clustered into some unique clades. Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) was a powerful system in reconstruction of phylogenetic relations among evaluated crustacean species.
  • Genetic Characterization of Barley Genotypes via Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat
    Authors: Mustafa Yorgancılar, Emine Atalay, Necdet Akgün, Ali Topal, Keywords: Barley, crossbreed, genetic similarity, ISSR. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1340268 Abstract: In this study, polymerase chain reaction based Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) from DNA fingerprinting techniques were used to investigate the genetic relationships among barley crossbreed genotypes in Turkey. It is important that selection based on the genetic base in breeding programs via ISSR, in terms of breeding time. 14 ISSR primers generated a total of 97 bands, of which 81 (83.35%) were polymorphic. The highest total resolution power (RP) value was obtained from the F2 (0.53) and M16 (0.51) primers. According to the ISSR result, the genetic similarity index changed between 0.64–095; Lane 3 with Line 6 genotypes were the closest, while Line 36 were the most distant ones. The ISSR markers were found to be promising for assessing genetic diversity in barley crossbreed genotypes.
  • BeamGA Median: A Hybrid Heuristic Search Approach
    Authors: Ghada Badr, Manar Hosny, Nuha Bintayyash, Eman Albilali, Souad Larabi Marie-Sainte, Keywords: Median problem, phylogenetic tree, permutation, genetic algorithm, beam search, genome rearrangement distance. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1131105 Abstract: The median problem is significantly applied to derive the most reasonable rearrangement phylogenetic tree for many species. More specifically, the problem is concerned with finding a permutation that minimizes the sum of distances between itself and a set of three signed permutations. Genomes with equal number of genes but different order can be represented as permutations. In this paper, an algorithm, namely BeamGA median, is proposed that combines a heuristic search approach (local beam) as an initialization step to generate a number of solutions, and then a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is applied in order to refine the solutions, aiming to achieve a better median with the smallest possible reversal distance from the three original permutations. In this approach, any genome rearrangement distance can be applied. In this paper, we use the reversal distance. To the best of our knowledge, the proposed approach was not applied before for solving the median problem. Our approach considers true biological evolution scenario by applying the concept of common intervals during the GA optimization process. This allows us to imitate a true biological behavior and enhance genetic approach time convergence. We were able to handle permutations with a large number of genes, within an acceptable time performance and with same or better accuracy as compared to existing algorithms.
  • Reverse Engineering of Agricultural Machinery: A Key to Food Sufficiency in Nigeria
    Authors: Williams S. Ebhota, Virginia Chika Ebhota, Samuel A. Ilupeju, Keywords: Agricultural machinery, domestic manufacturing, forward engineering, production reverse engineering, technology. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1130057 Abstract: Agriculture employs about three-quarter of Nigeria's workforce and yet food sufficiency is a challenge in the country. This is largely due to poor and outdated pre-harvest and post-harvest farming practices. The land fallow system is still been practised as fertiliser production in the country is grossly inadequate and expensive. The few available post-harvest processing facilities are faced with ageing and are inefficient. Also, use of modern processing equipment is limited by farmers' lack of fund, adequate capacity to operate and maintain modern farming equipment. This paper, therefore, examines key barriers to agricultural products processing equipment in the country. These barriers include over-dependence on foreign technologies and expertise; poor and inadequate manufacturing infrastructure; and lack of political will by political leaders; lack of funds; and lack of adequate technical skills. This paper, however, sees the increase in the domestic manufacturing of pre-harvest and post-harvest machinery and equipment through reverse engineering approach as a key to food production sufficiency in Nigeria.
  • Natural Preservatives: An Alternative for Chemical Preservative Used in Foods
    Authors: Zerrin Erginkaya, Gözde Konuray, Keywords: Animal origin preservatives, antimicrobial, chemical preservatives, herbal preservatives. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1130043 Abstract: Microbial degradation of foods is defined as a decrease of food safety due to microorganism activity. Organic acids, sulfur dioxide, sulfide, nitrate, nitrite, dimethyl dicarbonate and several preservative gases have been used as chemical preservatives in foods as well as natural preservatives which are indigenous in foods. It is determined that usage of herbal preservatives such as blueberry, dried grape, prune, garlic, mustard, spices inhibited several microorganisms. Moreover, it is determined that animal origin preservatives such as whey, honey, lysosomes of duck egg and chicken egg, chitosan have antimicrobial effect. Other than indigenous antimicrobials in foods, antimicrobial agents produced by microorganisms could be used as natural preservatives. The antimicrobial feature of preservatives depends on the antimicrobial spectrum, chemical and physical features of material, concentration, mode of action, components of food, process conditions, and pH and storage temperature. In this review, studies about antimicrobial components which are indigenous in food (such as herbal and animal origin antimicrobial agents), antimicrobial materials synthesized by microorganisms, and their usage as an antimicrobial agent to preserve foods are discussed.
  • Treatment of Mycotic Dermatitis in Domestic Animals with Poly Herbal Drug
    Authors: U. Umadevi, T. Umakanthan, Keywords: Allopathic drugs, dermatitis, domestic animals, poly herbal formulation. DOI:10.5281/zenodo.1127056 Abstract: Globally, mycotic dermatitis is very common but there is no single proven specific allopathic treatment regimen. In this study, domestic animals with skin diseases of different age and breed from geographically varied regions of Tamil Nadu state, India were employed. Most of them have had previous treatment with native and allopathic medicines without success. Clinically, the skin lesions were found to be mild to severe. The trial animals were treated with poly herbal formulation (ointment) prepared using the indigenous medicinal plants – viz Andrographis paniculata, Lawsonia inermis and Madhuca longifolia. Allopathic antifungal drugs and ointments, povidone iodine and curabless (Terbinafine HCl, Ofloxacin, Ornidazole, Clobetasol propionate) were used in control. Comparatively, trial animals were found to have lesser course of treatment time and higher recovery rate than control. In Ethnoveterinary, this combination was tried for the first time. This herbal formulation is economical and an alternative for skin diseases.